Did you know that when you are stressed, inadvertently this negative emotion could help you in a positive way. Somehow, the endorphin levels circulate the blood in such a manner, that overall the side effects can be beneficial to your physiognomy. And do you know who told me this information? Writer: Tony Bedard; Artist: Tyler Kirkham; and Publisher: DC Comics. They told me this in October 2011.

Not so long ago, struggling young artist, Kyle Rayner, was given the last Green Lantern power-ring from the last surviving custodian of this weapon – the Guardian, Ganthet. Moreover, in more recent times, power rings of many other colours are heading his way also: The yellow ring of fear from a deceased member of the Sinestro Corps – the red ring of rage from a ferocious member of the Red Lanterns – and the pink ring of love from an incarcerated member of the Star Sapphires.

What a lucky git Kyle is, huh?

Now how do you suppose associates of these multi-coloured rings take to Kyle’s peculiar predicament? Because do think that Fatality and three other members of three other ‘clans’, are happy to see these power rings hovering around Kyle after he saves a builder from being squashed?

No – I do know think so either – to be continued...

So here was have it folks, an earth-bound galactic comic book series that nobody asked for. Well? Except for people who like there heroes to cosmetically clash, ha! Just kidding. Still, the start to this ‘New Guardian’ series does feel slightly peculiar in tone, as it is... errr... how can I put it?  Too quick to read? Yes – but not that. Very bold in style? Yes – but not that either. OK then, what about simple in structure? Yes again – but not that either-either.

As you see – personally speaking of course – my problem with this issue is how it begins. Now I presume that the opening sequence is set in the past – and illustrates how Kyle got his power ring in the first place. Though the only thing that makes me presume this, is because when the subsequent section commences, its does present us with a caption that states ‘In Present Day’ – insinuating that what came before it was set in the past. Also, in addition to this, the following story does feel as if it should be in an animated cartoon – as the tone and feel to it is rather ‘kiddie friendly’ all in all.

OK, now that is not really a large criticism within the scheme of things. Because even though this opening issue does have a rather paint it by number feel to it, on the other side of the spectrum (excuse the pun) – the art by Tyler Kirkham is really nice and dynamic – and the story by Tony Bedard is an intriguing pretext to follow. Now I feel that this is a fairly good start to this series – as it titivates – promotes – and lavishes the reader with a concept of what is to come next.

Good start – confusing in places – elaborate in others.