Bloody hell! What in the name of all things Ganthet is that cover supposed to represent? Hal Jordan having a face-lift perhaps? Or better yet, what about the diametrically opposed dichotomy that's being infringed on Hal's own inner child? Huh? What's that? You want me to shut my own butt-hole and just introduce you to this great issue created by: Robert Venditti, Dale Eaglesham, and Billy Tan? Alright then. I will. But only because DC Comics told me to, in February, 2014.

To QUOTE Benjamin Franklin: 'Beware of little expenses. A small leak will sink a great ship'.

In this issue of Green Lantern, entitled 'Harsh Realities', we get to see how a handful of convicted Braidsmen manage to escape from the Green Lantern Corps' clutches, only to then rip this interplanetary police-force's reputation to shreds.

Admittedly, they don't do it all by themselves! No. Of course not. One of there member is a shape shifting Dulan, who gets the opportunity to knock out Hal, take his place, before broadcasting a message over the airwaves that shocks everybody who listens to it.


Also, another part of this story deals with how Sordak tries to help Saint Walker recover from his injuries. Bless her.

In my most humble opinion this was one hell of a great issue of 'Green Lantern' to read.

Yeah! Straight up, folks! Dale Eaglesham's artwork was just amazing on the page. And I especially loved the way he depicted each characters expressive posturing and demeanor, particularly that fish-guy and Kilowog.

And as for Robert Venditti's story -- well -- what can I say about that? That was superb. No. Better than 'superb'! It was out of this bloody world. I personally loved the manner in which the story crept up on you. Evolving from a simple tale about a handful of escaped space-convicts, only to then develop into a full scale attack on the corps!

Oh! And before I forget, I did love that section with Saint and Sordak too. Despite it being a minor part of this adventure, I still enjoyed the way it showed another side of the Green Lantern Corps. A more caring and professional side.

The only slight problem I had with this tale would be that it began in a very aloof manner. I mean, in the first few scenes we saw Hal paying Saint and Sordak a visit, before hanging out with Kilowog. When suddenly its overall direction and vibe changed with that whole Braidsmen scenario I've previously explained. Now don't get me wrong. This isn't a major gripe within the scheme of things. Yet tonally this departure was slightly too abrupt for my own tastes.

No, dear reader! I haven't compared this story to David Guetta's song, 'Titanium', because they both feature the Australian singer, 'Sia'. What I've done instead is pared them up because they're both about versatile substances you can use to fight against your oppressors.

With all due respect I feel compelled to compare this comic book to a car crash. Not physically of course. But on a purely aesthetic level both of these... errr... things, have a way about them that's slow in the happening, fast in the execution, and shocking to witness.

As you might have guessed by reading what I've said up above, folks, I really did enjoy how this issue of 'Green Lantern' turned out. The artwork was amazing. The story-line was sublime. And the only thing that let it down would be a slight pacing issue at the beginning of the parable.

However, something I've deliberately failed to mention previously is how this tale ended. Now without giving too much away, I got a right kick out of that scene where the Dulan turned the Corps' reputation on its head, by... errr... how can I put this? Oh! I know. Saying something he shouldn't of, which resulted in everyone now hating them.

Still. I wonder how Hal and the Corps are going to get out of this mess? Obviously Hal has to explain to everyone that it wasn't him that did the deed. Nonetheless, will that be enough do undo this damage? And if not, what else can he do to rectify this dire turn up for the comic books?

Hmmm. Nuff said.