Halloween Man Cover Out of the following five people, who do you think once said, 'Comics are something deeper and more important'? Would it be: (A) Adolph Hitler. (B) Drew Edwards. (C) Mahatma Gandhi. (D) Sergio Calvet. Or (E) A Potato. Huh? What's that? You don't know who said this sentence! Tut-tut-tut! You best check out the following interview then! Eh?

Halloween Man At Indy Planet

1) What are your own origins, Drew and Sergio?   DREW: I'm from the great state of Texas, in the good ol' US of A. I grew up around Possum Kingdom Lake in a small town named Graham. It was a really good place for a writer to grow up because the surrounding woods proved to be fertile grounds for my young imagination. That and the local library's collection of vintage comic books of course.

Halloween Man ArtSERGIO: After some years of trying to break into the Spanish comic book market, and then discovering that there wasn't a 'Spanish comic book market', I decided to take a break from drawing comics.

Not so long after that, Drew contacted me to draw a short story for his character, Halloween Man. I was familiar with his work and thought it could be fun to give it a try.

It took me forever to draw that first five page story. I was certainly rusty, but that led to two more short stories, then to a special. More or less I've been drawing 'Halloween Man' for the last ten years or so.

2) How did you two first meet-up?   SERGIO: I think it was through the old Millarworld boards, sometime around 2004. In fact, most of the writers I collaborate with, I met through that board during that specific period of time.

DREW: Sergio and I live on two different sides of the world and have never even been in the same room together. Yet we've had this massive impact on each other's lives. So this really is a 21st century partnership.

I know him via Russell Hillman, who has been the editor of 'Halloween Man' for close to a decade now. He was the one who really put the two of us together. Sergio previously worked on “It's the Beer Talking”, Russ's humor comic. And as Sergio mentioned, we all “hung out” on Millarworld.

Halloween Man At Halloween3) How did ‘Halloween Man’ come about? It’s ‘secret origin’ so to speak.   DREW: I've always loved to tell stories, but didn't seriously think about it as a career until I was almost into my twenties. When you're a teenager you feel like you have all the time in the world and then suddenly reality starts crashing in. You ask “what do I do with myself?” I love comics, monster movies, and writing, so writing a monster comic seemed like a logical choice.

I wanted to create a story where the monster was the “hero” and got the girl. I wanted the comic to have this kind of Rock 'n' Roll outsider vibe to it too. Then the name “Halloween Man” came to me while listening to the Misfits song, “Halloween”.  It was like lightning in a bottle. Once I had the name, everything else started coming together.

Certain details changed, but the name was really the key. From there we got the pumpkin shirt, the 70's punk type look, and all of the other important stuff.

SERGIO: For me 'Halloween Man' is a bit like the old original Marvel comics, but with a taste of those low budget horror movies you could find in an old video store.

4) What song would you say best represents this project and why?   DREW: Well, the obvious answer would be “Halloween” by the Misfits. Although I will put in a dark horse vote for Roky Erikson's, “Burn the Flames”.

SERGIO: In my opinion it would be “Main Man” by the Ramones. But if I had to choose a composer for a Halloween Man movie, then I’d probably say, Richard Band.

Elvis Caracature
5) If you could get a celebrity – either living or dead – to promote your wares, who would you choose, and why would you want to choose this particular person?   DREW: Elvis Presley! Go with the King or go home! Can you imagine the stir it would cause if Elvis came back from the dead and promoted Halloween Man? The free publicity would be huge!

6) What have you learnt about yourselves through this endeavour? And were there any unforeseen obstacles you had to contend with along the way?   DREW: I think when I was younger, I expected everything to fall into place and for my career to basically be laid out for me. I was putting out a book and I felt like it was a good read so clearly, Marvel and DC should be kicking down my door.

Boy, that was arrogant of me. 

So I suppose my biggest obstacle was my youthful pride. But often when pride goes, your talent grows. I had a lot of drive at 19, but I'm a much better writer at 35.

SERGIO: I've learned to move forward no matter what life decides to put in my way, to behave professionally, and to honor my word. For me, Halloween Man has been a series of challenges that have given me the chance and incentive to prove myself and evolve as an artist while having fun. And I've learned A LOT about what it takes to produce a comic book, not only as an artist, but also as a letterer, designer, and editor.

Halloween Man Bad Religion7) During your time in this field, what is the one thing that has kept you in good stead?   DIEGO: I believe in what I am doing. I have faith that I am doing good work and I greatly enjoy my collaborators. In my mind, I often compare creating comics to a religious calling. There are certainly easier things to do with your life. But the drive and challenge is what makes you whole. Everything else is just “work”.  Comics are something deeper and more important.

SERGIO: Simply put, I love to draw comic books. When I’m not drawing them I’m a cranky fellow. When I’m happy I draw, and when I draw I’m happy.

8) If ‘Halloween Man’ had a motto, what would it be?   DIEGO: That it’s okay to be different; to look different, or to have a different way of looking at the world, even if it is sometimes harder. I've set out to show the world the heroic side of being strange.

Ka-Pow! What a great note to end an interview on! Correct, dear readers? So when you've got the time you know what you have to do. Check out the official Halloween Man website today. Trust me. It's one hell of a great read.