SAVAGE WOLVERINE #21

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[ HANDS UP. THIS IS A SALE
Badges? We ain't got no stinking badges! We don't need no stinking badges! And I don't have to show you any stinking badges! All I have to do is sit down, relax, and check out the following comic book Created by: John Arcudi, Joe Quinones, Kevin Nowlan; and Published by: Marvel, in August, 2014.

To QUOTE Lester B. Pearson: 'As a soldier, I survived World War 1 when most of my comrades did not'.

THE STORY:
In this timely tale set during World War One, we get to see Sergeant Logan and a rag tag group of Canadian solders attack a pack of Nazi's who've commandeered a bridge. And then, as soon as one of Logan's 'brothers in arms' telepathically gleans some information from those goose-stepping git's, he then finds himself in a most peculiar stalemate indeed!

Now, does anybody care for a flash-back sequence? Hint-Hint!

THE GOOD:
As some of you may already know, I'm the type of person who doesn't need 'the hard sale' where it comes to tales set in olden times. In my opinion history, pathos, and adventure in general are all part of the same collective group. Constantly evolving and developing throughout the ages, whilst still keeping in sink with what is happening in the 'past' and in the 'present'.

So having said all that, what do you think I feel about this wartime issue of 'Savage Wolverine'?  Annoyed that it didn't share a timely tone? Happy that the creator's wanted to tackle such a period of history? Or how about glad that the characters showed character where as the story showed intrigue? Especially during those foreshadowing scenes that set up and finished off this issue!

Well, I suppose all of these factors mattered more or less. Ish. Yet overall I did love the artwork, the authenticity in some of characters, plus the execution of what actually happened during this period of time.

THE BAD:
By in large it's quite difficult to create one of these genre based story-lines, because in a short amount of time you have to set up the pretext, introduce the characters, and basically execute the plot. So that's what I'd say was my biggest problem -- the pacing of the overall issue -- cause in no uncertain terms a lot of exposition had to be crammed into the smallest of spaces -- so to speak.  

THE MUSIC:
Whenever I think of war plus all of that army type stuff, I can't help but recollect the theme tune played in the 1955 wartime classic, 'The Dam Busters'.




Yes. I know the Dam Busters was set during World War Two and not World War One. But you know what I mean, right?  

THE COMPARISON:
OK. So this is most probably my silly side speaking. Nevertheless, from my jovial perspective this tale reminded me of the English sitcom, Blackadder Goes Forth, because conceptually they're both trying to do the same thing although tonally from two different directions.

THE CONCLUSION:
Now to commemorate this World War One Issue of 'Savage Wolverine', I thought it would be a jolly good idea to present to you some strange facts about this debacle.

  1. Most of the officers armed themselves with service revolvers, not rifles, because they were a lot less easier for the enemy to spot.
  2. The army allowed troops to visit official licensed brothels, as sex was considered a needed physical activity for the men.
  3. Canadian Nursing Sisters who joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps were given the rank of Lieutenant, where as their British counterparts weren't.
  4. This was the first war where more troops died from enemy action than from disease.
  5. On average the life expectancy of someone in the trenches was about six week's tops.
  6. Although British solders where meant to be at least 19 years of age to enlist in this war, it was commonly known that many of them where a lot-lot younger.
  7. Per year fifteen percent of soldiers were requested to guard the front-line, and usually for no more than two weeks at a time.
  8. Some of the famous people who served during World War One include AA Milne, JRR Tolkien, and Basil Rathbone.

Nuff said.