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CINEMATIC OFFICES DESIGNED BY SIX TOP MOVIE DIRECTORS

Movie OfficeOut of curiosity, who would you turn to if you ever wanted to redesign your place of work? I mean, would you hire an experienced interior decorator with a conventional style? Or would you prefer to engage the services of someone a bit more specific? Someone like a filmmaker, for instance. A notable filmmaker from Hollywood with a track record for producing visually stimulating classics. Well, if you like the sound of the latter option, then why don’t you check out the following article which reimagines six offices as if they were designed by famous directors? It was written by me and features six images developed by Brother UK. Enjoy.





Wes Anderson

Wes Anderson

Some of his movies include: The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), Moonrise Kingdom (2012), and The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014).
Visual style: Wes Anderson is a very stylized director because he usually composes his films with the use of stoic, chapter headings, symmetrical cinematography, and a bold, pastel color palette, illustrated by a copious amount of vintage furniture and scenery. He’s also known for having a rather placid sense of humor, and generally, his films are uniquely his own.


Tim Burton

Tim Burton

Some of his movies include: Beetlejuice (1988), Batman (1989), and Edward Scissorhands (1990).
Visual style: Tim Burton is an animator, a filmmaker, and a big fan of b-movies from the 1940s to the 1950s, particularly b-movies steeped in Gothic horror, bizarre fantasies, and murky murder mysteries. In fact, these influences can be seen throughout his work, because Tim possesses a bold, Gothic style, that adheres to a contrasting color palette and a range of retro designs that are aesthetically appealing.


Hayao Miyazaki

Hayao Miyazaki

Some of his movies include: Spirited Away (2001), My Neighbor Totoro (1988), and Howl's Moving Castle (2004).
Visual style: Hayao Miyazaki is an artist, animator, and filmmaker from Japan, who specializes in calm, tranquil storytelling with a strong manga edge and a traditional Asian style. He’s been working in the film industry since the 1960s, and in 1985, he co-founded a film and animation studio, entitled, ‘Studio Ghibli’.


Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick

Some of his movies include: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), The Shining (1980), and Dr. Strangelove (1964). 
Visual style: At face value, Stanley Kubrick appears to be the type of director who conforms to the genre of story he’s trying to tell, be it a wartime epic or a classic, period, melodrama. But upon closer inspection, you’ll notice that he likes to juxtapose the variety of different elements featured in his films in order to give us something old and something new at exactly the same time.


Guillermo del Toro 

Guillermo Del Toro

Some of his movies include: The Shape of Water (2017), Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), and Hellboy (2004).
Visual style: Similar to Tim BurtonGuillermo del Toro is a big fan of b-movies from the 1940s to the 1950s. Unlike Tim, though, he prefers monsters over Gothic fairytales and comic book adventures over surreal fables. So much so, in fact, that Guillermo's directorial style seems far more 'pulp' in comparison.


Baz Luhrmann

Baz Luhrmann

Some of his movies include: The Great Gatsby (2013), Moulin Rouge! (2001), and Romeo + Juliet (1996).
Visual style: Baz Luhrmann is a director from Australia who has a style that is both lavish and theatrical by design. Usually, he favors a black and red color palette and a lighting scheme that’s reminiscent of early-20th Century theatres. He’s also known for favoring period pieces rather than more contemporary adventures.

In closing, I would like to thank Brother UK for collaborating with me on this article, before encouraging you to check out their Website, Facebook, and Twitter pages.

CINEMATIC OFFICES DESIGNED BY SIX TOP MOVIE DIRECTORS CINEMATIC OFFICES DESIGNED BY SIX TOP MOVIE DIRECTORS Reviewed by David Andrews on January 11, 2021 Rating: 5

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