To some, Alan Scott is the first Green Lantern to ever grace a comic book page. Yet to the likes of Robert Venditti, Martin Coccolo, Billy Tan, and to a certain extent, DC Comics, well, he's a good marketing gimmick, isn't he? Especially if you stand him next to Hal, in the month of September, 2015!

To QUOTE Fishermen and people with Aids: 'Hey! Look what I've caught!'.

With all due respect I'd say this issue of Green Lantern could easily have been missed. Please note, I did say with respect. Because even though I did enjoy reading an awful lot of this adventure, especially the dynamics between Hal and Trapper, at the end of the day, however, this episode was a stop-gap episode. It came. It told its tale. And then it went back home and had a nap. 

You see, on a purely conceptual level the tale plays out as follows. When Hal Jordan and Trapper land on a desolate planet, with the intent of finding a medical person to heal their wounded pal, Virgo, as soon as they accomplish this task, out of the blue they are suddenly attacked by a pack of marauding Thanagarians. But of course, with Hal and Trapper being the somewhat nice people they truly are (insert overly silly rebuttal here), they won't allow a bunch of bird-brained cretins to kick their asses. No. Of course not. And so, as expected, they fight, they swap witty banter, and eventually, either side does whatever it is they need to do, blah-blah-blah, ding-dang-dong, game over.

Now please, don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to say that I didn't like reading this stand alone story. The first thing I liked about it was Billy's and Martin's anime inspired artwork: as they both complemented each other, without loosing their own styles in the process. Furthermore, Robert Venditti's simple western themed pretext (i.e. a good man has to save an oppressed village from a gang of villains) was aided with some really keen dynamics between the two principle hero's (loved the idea of the bomb bracelet. Robert must have stolen it from the Suicide Squad book).

That said, the one thing about this tale that did get on my nerves...

... was the depiction of the Hawk-people. I mean, is it just me, or have you noticed how the Thanagarians have changed into an evil race since the advent of the New 52! Back in the day, the Thanagarians were a warring race, but never a warring race without any direction or principles. At the moment, well, they seem savage, single faceted, and a somewhat pale counterpart of their previous selves.

So, in honor of what they once were, I now feel compelled to match up this comic book to 'The Birdy Song'.

I'd like to compare this month's tale to someone going fishing. Want to know why? Well, it has to do with how the doctor in it was used as bait by the bad guys, hint-hint!
As soon as Hal begins his battle with the marauding Thanagarians, by his own accord he then let's out one of the most silliest battle cry's I've ever heard. So, because I can't think of anything else to say, let's see if you can guess what Hal says out of the following eight options.

  1. Peace and love, equates to a big green boxing glove.
  2. Hal Jordan doesn't need a police cordon.
  3. As de la vista, baby.
  4. Don't ring on my ding-a-ling-ling.
  5. I own the sky.
  6. My light can put up a fight.
  7. I was once green, but now I can rip out your spleen.
  8. Shazam!!!
Nuff said.