Look out DC, because in the month of February, 2015, your comic book covers are going to be attacked by Harley Quinn. So go on. Get Robert Venditti to strap on his stockings. Or ask Brett Booth to roll up his tights. It won't matter. Nothing will ever matter. Ever, ever again.

To QUOTE Stephen Covey: 'Trust is the glue of life. It's the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It's the foundational principle that holds all relationships'.

Once upon a time there were two versions of the Flash. Now one of these versions -- let's call him the good Flash, shall we? -- was reluctantly thrust into a place beyond space and time, and had to follow a treacherous path that will hopefully -- touch wood -- lead him back to full power again. But as for the other Flash, on the other hand, well, just between me and you, last issue Iris West caught him severely maiming a known villain. And now, in this very issue, she teams-up with Patty Spivot, and together they see him attempt to do the same thing once again.

Yeah! Straight up! It was roughly around the same time the nice Flash was slammed at the back of the neck, before being tied down onto a sacrificial alter..... THUNK!


To be continued...

To be absolutely honest with you, dear reader, I can't really say for certain if I actually enjoyed reading this issue or not. On the one hand I loved the sight of Brett's hyper detailed artwork, I was engrossed by the characters involved, and I was very intrigued by the general plot-line as well. On the other hand, however, I'm afraid to say that this story was nothing more than just another stepping stone story-line.

You see, to me, all this adventure had to do was progress the characters respective stories a few steps further down the line. And yes. It did do just that in a very grand way. Seeing Patty team-up with Iris, as well as the way good Barry was duped by people I best not mention yet, was very surprising to follow. Captivating even.

Yet having said all that...

...in the same breath there was something rather mundane about this tale too.

Admittedly, what that something actually was I can't really put my finger on at the moment. Although maybe it had something to do with the way that the current 'villain of the month' was set up and then spat out. Or even the notion that good Barry's plight might be venturing into tried and tested territory.

Nonetheless, mundane is what mundane does. And in my eyes it made this issue less spectacular somehow, and more pedestrian than usual.  

Now depending on how you're looking at it, I'd say the central theme running throughout this issue relies heavily on the concept of trust. For instance, in the case of good Barry: it's him trusting the people that are currently helping him out. Whereas in the case of bad Barry: it's if those people around him are able to trust him in turn.

So to me, personally speaking, whenever I hear the word 'Trust', I always think of that Prince song showcased in the first Tim Burton Batman movie.

[Sorry. Couldn't get the Trust song. But this one more than makes up for it, eh?]

Just to get this comparison out of my head, I'm now going to compare this comic book to the Steven Spielberg film franchise, Jurassic whatever, largely due to those reptilian creatures running around all over that place beyond space and time.

Sorry. I promise to try and think of a better comparison next month.

At the very end of this issue Mister Token Villain says something to bad Barry that may or may not possibly come true. So just for fun -- hypothetically -- can you guess what he says out of the following eight options?

  1. I want to punch you in the mouth with my lips.
  2. Kim Kardashian has been voted in as president of the United States.
  3. It's your turn to suffer.
  4. I like you because you smell of eggs.
  5. Miley who?
  6. Quentin Tarantino's face has stopped morphing into a potato.
  7. Never trust an undertaker. He'll always let you down.
  8. Wally West is white?
Nuff said.