I once went to a parallel dimension. It was quite nice because it had plenty of suspension. But I was also quite ill. When I swallowed a blue pill. That stated I was ready for my pension. Not unlike the feelings of Writer: Jeff Lemire; Artist: Mikel Janin; and Publisher: DC Comics in February 2013. Allegedly. Hint-Hint!

Using GENERAL terms, answer the following 4 questions about this STORY entitled 'Night of The Hunter'.
  • WHAT'S THE MAIN THRUST OF THIS TALE: Whilst Timothy Hunter and Zatanna learn the origins of 'the Wild' -- plus how Timothy is connected to it -- Deadman isn't dying, Constantine stops lying, Xanadu starts aging, Frank and Orchard tries hitting, plus Epoch -- one of the guardians protecting this foreign land -- try's capturing.
  • ANYTHING ELSE HAPPEN: Yes again. But I'm not telling you what it is because I don't want to spoil the surprise.
  • HOW DOES THIS STORY END: When a mysterious thunderstorm suddenly threatens two worlds! Theirs and ours.

What is the most memorable SENTENCE OR CONVERSATION spoken in this issue?
There were quite a few snippets of dialogue that caught my eye in this issue which I really did like the sound of. 'Feel the wrath of Frankenstein...eh?' being one of them (because it sounded funny). And the name 'Alkon' being another (because it sounded like Alci... as in Alcoholic)'. But for me, the one phrase that summed up this issue to a tea would have to be 'I've doomed us all'.

Not telling you why though. Ha!

What was the BEST thing about this issue?
Without a shadow of a doubt, I was really captivated by Mikel Janin's artwork in this yarn, plus how the origin of 'The Wild' began to envelop a stage at a time. Personally speaking, I found this amalgamation of pictures and words very complementary as a tale in its own right, and did flow rather more smoothly than the other section of the story with Deadman, John, and the rest, battling Epoch.

What was the WORST thing about this issue?
What the hell was that whole opening sequence all about, huh? The one with Deadman bringing back some cheesy villain called 'Infernal Core' from hell, only for Epoch to kill him within one single panel!!! No! Something didn't feel right with that at all. This scene felt like pure 'page filler' if ever I saw it.

Hmm. Maybe that contest 'Syfy' are holding with DC needs some fine tuning? Huh? Say no more.

What was the most INNOVATIVE thing about this issue?
As much as I wasn't overly keen on that section with Deadman and the gang fighting Epoch, I have to say that these segments did have a very despondent feel to them, as well as being quite funny to boot -- aided and abetted with John's inability to lie of course.

Now isn't that an original mix-mash of emotions, dear reader? Despondent and funny.

Pick TWO CHARACTERS out this comic book, and compare them individually to a SIMPSONS CAST MEMBER.
DR. NICK AS JOHN CONSTANTINE: Now I didn't think I'd ever say this, but because of the way Johnny acts in this adventure, he'd make a pretty decent match to this... hmmm... medical person.

COMIC BOOK GUY AS EPOCH: I've made this comparison due to the fact that both of these characters are big, surly, and miserable looking.

What WORD or PHRASE could you use to sum-up this story?
'Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic' -- Arthur C. Clarke

What SONG, THEME-TUNE, or MELODY, would complement this tale, as well as add and extra dimension to it by default?
'COULD THIS BE MAGIC' BY BARRY MANILOW: No. I'm not 'having a laugh', dear reader! Both this comic book and this song do share a certain spiritual kinship that's part-mechanical, and part... errr... magical.   

Would you think me mad if I told you that the origin of 'the Wild' was actually derived from real life events? You would, wouldn't you? You'd day something like 'Oh sh*t! Our ever loving reviewer has taken too much medication again, and now believes he's trapped in a world where science and magic fight against each other for supremacy'.

But fret not, dear reader. My meds are in check and I have not blown my gasket. Yet. What I'm referring to is the manner in which society of 'ye' olde England' once distrusted both science and magic in equal measures (or Alchemy as it was then known).

Honest to God. Do a google. Back in those rustic days doctors were looked upon as 'magicians' of sort's, and carpenters and craftsmen were 'men of science'. And it has only been since the 18th /19th century, that these two subjects have been given a lot more merit than 'hocus pocus pudding and pie'.

Hmmm! I'm feeling hungry now.  

GIVE IT, IT'S DUES: This issue was like an old wizard telling you that one of your cousin's is an alien. Shocking at first -- yet ultimately understandable.